mongos

Synopsis

mongos for “MongoDB Shard,” is a routing service for MongoDB shard configurations that processes queries from the application layer, and determines the location of this data in the sharded cluster, in order to complete these operations. From the perspective of the application, a mongos instance behaves identically to any other MongoDB instance.

Considerations

Never change the name of the mongos binary.

Options

Core Options

mongos
--help, -h

Returns information on the options and use of mongos.

--version

Returns the mongos release number.

--config <filename>, -f <filename>

Specifies a configuration file for runtime configuration options. The configuration file is the preferred method for runtime configuration of mongos. The options are equivalent to the command-line configuration options. See Configuration File Options for more information.

Ensure the configuration file uses ASCII encoding. The mongos instance does not support configuration files with non-ASCII encoding, including UTF-8.

--verbose, -v

Increases the amount of internal reporting returned on standard output or in log files. Increase the verbosity with the -v form by including the option multiple times, (e.g. -vvvvv.)

--quiet

Runs mongos in a quiet mode that attempts to limit the amount of output.

This option suppresses:

  • output from database commands
  • replication activity
  • connection accepted events
  • connection closed events
--port <port>

Default: 27017

Specifies the TCP port on which the MongoDB instance listens for client connections.

--bind_ip <ip address>

Default: All interfaces.

Changed in version 2.6.0: The deb and rpm packages include a default configuration file (/etc/mongod.conf) that sets --bind_ip to 127.0.0.1.

Specifies the IP address that mongos binds to in order to listen for connections from applications. You may attach mongos to any interface. When attaching mongos to a publicly accessible interface, ensure that you have implemented proper authentication and firewall restrictions to protect the integrity of your database.

--maxConns <number>

The maximum number of simultaneous connections that mongos will accept. This setting has no effect if it is higher than your operating system’s configured maximum connection tracking threshold.

Do not assign too low of a value to this option, or you will encounter errors during normal application operation.

This is particularly useful for a mongos if you have a client that creates multiple connections and allows them to timeout rather than closing them.

In this case, set maxIncomingConnections to a value slightly higher than the maximum number of connections that the client creates, or the maximum size of the connection pool.

This setting prevents the mongos from causing connection spikes on the individual shards. Spikes like these may disrupt the operation and memory allocation of the sharded cluster.

Note

Changed in version 2.6: MongoDB removed the upward limit on the maxIncomingConnections setting.

--syslog

Sends all logging output to the host’s syslog system rather than to standard output or to a log file. , as with --logpath.

The --syslog option is not supported on Windows.

--syslogFacility <string>

Default: user

Specifies the facility level used when logging messages to syslog. The value you specify must be supported by your operating system’s implementation of syslog. To use this option, you must enable the --syslog option.

--logpath <path>

Sends all diagnostic logging information to a log file instead of to standard output or to the host’s syslog system. MongoDB creates the log file at the path you specify.

By default, MongoDB will move any existing log file rather than overwrite it. To instead append to the log file, set the --logappend option.

--logappend

Appends new entries to the end of the existing log file when the mongos instance restarts. Without this option, mongod will back up the existing log and create a new file.

--redactClientLogData

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

A mongos running with --redactClientLogData redacts any message accompanying a given log event before logging. This prevents the mongos from writing potentially sensitive data stored on the database to the diagnostic log. Metadata such as error or operation codes, line numbers, and source file names are still visible in the logs.

Use --redactClientLogData in conjunction with encryption to assist compliance with regulatory requirements.

For example, a MongoDB deployment might store Personally Identifiable Information (PII) in one or more collections. The mongos logs events such as those related to CRUD operations, sharding metadata, etc. It is possible that the mongos may expose PII as a part of these logging operations. A mongos running with --redactClientLogData removes any message accompanying these events before being output to the log, effectively removing the PII.

Diagnostics on a mongos running with --redactClientLogData may be more difficult due to the lack of data related to a log event. See the process logging manual page for an example of the effect of --redactClientLogData on log output.

You can enable or disable log redaction on a running mongos using the setParameter database command.

db.getSiblingDB("admin").runCommand(
  { setParameter: { redactClientLogData : "true | false" } }
)
--timeStampFormat <string>

Default: iso8601-local

The time format for timestamps in log messages. Specify one of the following values:

Value Description
ctime Displays timestamps as Wed Dec 31 18:17:54.811.
iso8601-utc Displays timestamps in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) in the ISO-8601 format. For example, for New York at the start of the Epoch: 1970-01-01T00:00:00.000Z
iso8601-local Displays timestamps in local time in the ISO-8601 format. For example, for New York at the start of the Epoch: 1969-12-31T19:00:00.000-0500
--pidfilepath <path>

Specifies a file location to hold the process ID of the mongos process where mongos will write its PID. This is useful for tracking the mongos process in combination with the --fork option. Without a specified --pidfilepath option, the process creates no PID file.

--keyFile <file>

Specifies the path to a key file that stores the shared secret that MongoDB instances use to authenticate to each other in a sharded cluster or replica set. --keyFile implies --auth. See Internal Authentication for more information.

--setParameter <options>

Specifies one of the MongoDB parameters described in MongoDB Server Parameters. You can specify multiple setParameter fields.

--httpinterface

Deprecated since version 3.2: HTTP interface for MongoDB

Enables the HTTP interface. Enabling the interface can increase network exposure.

Leave the HTTP interface disabled for production deployments. If you do enable this interface, you should only allow trusted clients to access this port. See Firewalls.

Note

  • While MongoDB Enterprise does support Kerberos authentication, Kerberos is not supported in HTTP status interface in any version of MongoDB.

New in version 2.6.

--nounixsocket

Disables listening on the UNIX domain socket. --nounixsocket applies only to Unix-based systems.

The mongos process always listens on the UNIX socket unless one of the following is true:

New in version 2.6: mongos installed from official .deb and .rpm packages have the bind_ip configuration set to 127.0.0.1 by default.

--unixSocketPrefix <path>

Default: /tmp

The path for the UNIX socket. --unixSocketPrefix applies only to Unix-based systems.

If this option has no value, the mongos process creates a socket with /tmp as a prefix. MongoDB creates and listens on a UNIX socket unless one of the following is true:

--filePermissions <path>

Default: 0700

Sets the permission for the UNIX domain socket file.

--filePermissions applies only to Unix-based systems.

--fork

Enables a daemon mode that runs the mongos process in the background. By default mongos does not run as a daemon: typically you will run mongos as a daemon, either by using --fork or by using a controlling process that handles the daemonization process (e.g. as with upstart and systemd).

--transitionToAuth

New in version 3.4: Allows the mongos to accept and create authenticated and non-authenticated connections to and from other mongod and mongos instances in the deployment. Used for performing rolling transition of replica sets or sharded clusters from a no-auth configuration to internal authentication. Requires specifying a internal authentication mechanism such as --keyfile.

For example, if using keyfiles for internal authentication, the mongos creates an authenticated connection with any mongod or mongos in the deployment using a matching keyfile. If the security mechanisms do not match, the mongos utilizes a non-authenticated connection instead.

A mongos running with --transitionToAuth does not enforce user access controls. Users may connect to your deployment without any access control checks and perform read, write, and administrative operations.

Note

A mongos running with internal authentication and without --transitionToAuth requires clients to connect using user access controls. Update clients to connect to the mongos using the appropriate user prior to restarting mongos without --transitionToAuth.

Sharded Cluster Options

--configdb <replicasetName>/<config1>,<config2>...

Changed in version 3.2.

Specifies the configuration servers for the sharded cluster.

Starting in MongoDB 3.2, config servers for sharded clusters can be deployed as a replica set. The replica set config servers must run the WiredTiger storage engine. MongoDB 3.2 deprecates the use of three mirrored mongod instances for config servers.

Specify the config server replica set name and the hostname and port of at least one of the members of the config server replica set.

sharding:
  configDB: <configReplSetName>/cfg1.example.net:27017, cfg2.example.net:27017,...

The mongos instances for the sharded cluster must specify the same config server replica set name but can specify hostname and port of different members of the replica set.

--localThreshold

Default: 15

Specifies the ping time, in milliseconds, that mongos uses to determine which secondary replica set members to pass read operations from clients. The default value of 15 corresponds to the default value in all of the client drivers.

When mongos receives a request that permits reads to secondary members, the mongos will:

  • Find the member of the set with the lowest ping time.

  • Construct a list of replica set members that is within a ping time of 15 milliseconds of the nearest suitable member of the set.

    If you specify a value for the --localThreshold option, mongos will construct the list of replica members that are within the latency allowed by this value.

  • Select a member to read from at random from this list.

The ping time used for a member compared by the --localThreshold setting is a moving average of recent ping times, calculated at most every 10 seconds. As a result, some queries may reach members above the threshold until the mongos recalculates the average.

See the Read Preference for Replica Sets section of the read preference documentation for more information.

--upgrade

Updates the meta data format used by the config database.

TLS/SSL Options

See

Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL for full documentation of MongoDB’s support.

--sslOnNormalPorts

Deprecated since version 2.6.

Enables TLS/SSL for mongos.

With --sslOnNormalPorts, a mongos requires TLS/SSL encryption for all connections on the default MongoDB port, or the port specified by --port. By default, --sslOnNormalPorts is disabled.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslMode <mode>

New in version 2.6.

Enables TLS/SSL or mixed TLS/SSL used for all network connections. The argument to the --sslMode option can be one of the following:

Value Description
disabled The server does not use TLS/SSL.
allowSSL Connections between servers do not use TLS/SSL. For incoming connections, the server accepts both TLS/SSL and non-TLS/non-SSL.
preferSSL Connections between servers use TLS/SSL. For incoming connections, the server accepts both TLS/SSL and non-TLS/non-SSL.
requireSSL The server uses and accepts only TLS/SSL encrypted connections.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslPEMKeyFile <filename>

Specifies the .pem file that contains both the TLS/SSL certificate and key. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

You must specify --sslPEMKeyFile when TLS/SSL is enabled.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslPEMKeyPassword <value>

Specifies the password to de-crypt the certificate-key file (i.e. --sslPEMKeyFile). Use the --sslPEMKeyPassword option only if the certificate-key file is encrypted. In all cases, the mongos will redact the password from all logging and reporting output.

Changed in version 2.6: If the private key in the PEM file is encrypted and you do not specify the --sslPEMKeyPassword option, the mongos will prompt for a passphrase. See SSL Certificate Passphrase.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--clusterAuthMode <option>

Default: keyFile

New in version 2.6.

The authentication mode used for cluster authentication. If you use internal x.509 authentication, specify so here. This option can have one of the following values:

Value Description
keyFile Use a keyfile for authentication. Accept only keyfiles.
sendKeyFile For rolling upgrade purposes. Send a keyfile for authentication but can accept both keyfiles and x.509 certificates.
sendX509 For rolling upgrade purposes. Send the x.509 certificate for authentication but can accept both keyfiles and x.509 certificates.
x509 Recommended. Send the x.509 certificate for authentication and accept only x.509 certificates.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslClusterFile <filename>

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the .pem file that contains the x.509 certificate-key file for membership authentication for the cluster or replica set.

If --sslClusterFile does not specify the .pem file for internal cluster authentication, the cluster uses the .pem file specified in the --sslPEMKeyFile option.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslClusterPassword <value>

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the password to de-crypt the x.509 certificate-key file specified with --sslClusterFile. Use the --sslClusterPassword option only if the certificate-key file is encrypted. In all cases, the mongos will redact the password from all logging and reporting output.

If the x.509 key file is encrypted and you do not specify the --sslClusterPassword option, the mongos will prompt for a passphrase. See SSL Certificate Passphrase.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslCAFile <filename>

New in version 2.4.

Specifies the .pem file that contains the root certificate chain from the Certificate Authority. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

Warning

If the --sslCAFile option and its target file are not specified, x.509 client and member authentication will not function. mongod, and mongos in sharded systems, will not be able to verify the certificates of processes connecting to it against the trusted certificate authority (CA) that issued them, breaking the certificate chain.

As of version 2.6.4, mongod will not start with x.509 authentication enabled if the CA file is not specified.

--sslCRLFile <filename>

New in version 2.4.

Specifies the the .pem file that contains the Certificate Revocation List. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslAllowConnectionsWithoutCertificates

New in version 2.4.

Changed in version 3.0.0: --sslWeakCertificateValidation became --sslAllowConnectionsWithoutCertificates. For compatibility, MongoDB processes continue to accept --sslWeakCertificateValidation, but all users should update their configuration files.

Disables the requirement for TLS/SSL certificate validation that --sslCAFile enables. With the --sslAllowConnectionsWithoutCertificates option, the mongos will accept connections when the client does not present a certificate when establishing the connection.

If the client presents a certificate and the mongos has --sslAllowConnectionsWithoutCertificates enabled, the mongos will validate the certificate using the root certificate chain specified by --sslCAFile and reject clients with invalid certificates.

Use the --sslAllowConnectionsWithoutCertificates option if you have a mixed deployment that includes clients that do not or cannot present certificates to the mongos.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslAllowInvalidCertificates

New in version 2.6.

Bypasses the validation checks for TLS/SSL certificates on other servers in the cluster and allows the use of invalid certificates.

When using the --sslAllowInvalidCertificates setting, MongoDB logs a warning regarding the use of the invalid certificate.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslAllowInvalidHostnames

New in version 3.0.

Disables the validation of the hostnames in TLS/SSL certificates, when connecting to other mongos instances for inter-process authentication. This allows mongos to connect to other mongos instances if the hostnames in their certificates do not match their configured hostname.

Changed in version 3.0: Most MongoDB distributions now include support for TLS/SSL. See Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients for more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB.

--sslDisabledProtocols <protocol(s)>

New in version 3.0.7.

Prevents a MongoDB server running with SSL from accepting incoming connections that use a specific protocol or protocols. --sslDisabledProtocols recognizes the following protocols: TLS1_0, TLS1_1, and TLS1_2. Specifying an unrecognized protocol will prevent the server from starting.

To specify multiple protocols, use a comma separated list of protocols.

Members of replica sets and sharded clusters must speak at least one protocol in common.

--sslFIPSMode

New in version 2.4.

Directs the mongos to use the FIPS mode of the installed OpenSSL library. Your system must have a FIPS compliant OpenSSL library to use the --sslFIPSMode option.

Note

FIPS-compatible SSL is available only in MongoDB Enterprise. See Configure MongoDB for FIPS for more information.

Audit Options

--auditDestination

New in version 2.6.

Enables auditing and specifies where mongos sends all audit events.

--auditDestination can have one of the following values:

Value Description
syslog

Output the audit events to syslog in JSON format. Not available on Windows. Audit messages have a syslog severity level of info and a facility level of user.

The syslog message limit can result in the truncation of audit messages. The auditing system will neither detect the truncation nor error upon its occurrence.

console Output the audit events to stdout in JSON format.
file Output the audit events to the file specified in --auditPath in the format specified in --auditFormat.

Note

Available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

--auditFormat

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the format of the output file for auditing if --auditDestination is file. The --auditFormat option can have one of the following values:

Value Description
JSON Output the audit events in JSON format to the file specified in --auditPath.
BSON Output the audit events in BSON binary format to the file specified in --auditPath.

Printing audit events to a file in JSON format degrades server performance more than printing to a file in BSON format.

Note

Available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

--auditPath

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the output file for auditing if --auditDestination has value of file. The --auditPath option can take either a full path name or a relative path name.

Note

Available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

--auditFilter

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the filter to limit the types of operations the audit system records. The option takes a string representation of a query document of the form:

{ <field1>: <expression1>, ... }

The <field> can be any field in the audit message, including fields returned in the param document. The <expression> is a query condition expression.

To specify an audit filter, enclose the filter document in single quotes to pass the document as a string.

To specify the audit filter in a configuration file, you must use the YAML format of the configuration file.

Note

Available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

Text Search Options

--basisTechRootDirectory <path>

New in version 3.2.

Specify the root directory of the Basis Technology Rosette Linguistics Platform installation to support additional languages for text search operations.

Enterprise Feature

Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

LDAP Authentication and Authorization Options

--ldapServers <host1>:<port>,<host2>:<port>,...,<hostN>:<port>

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

Takes a quote-enclosed comma-separated string of one or more LDAP servers, each in host:port format. mongos executes LDAP operations against these servers to authenticate users or determine what actions a user is authorized to perform on a given database.

This setting can be configured on a running mongos using setParameter.

If unset, mongos cannot use LDAP authentication or authorization.

--ldapQueryUser <string>

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

The identity with which mongos binds as, when connecting to or performing queries on an LDAP server.

Only required if any of the following are true:

You must use --ldapQueryUser with --ldapQueryPassword.

If unset, mongos will not attempt to bind to the LDAP server.

This setting can be configured on a running mongos using setParameter.

Note

Windows MongoDB deployments can use --ldapBindWithOSDefaults instead of --ldapQueryUser and --ldapQueryPassword. You cannot specify both --ldapQueryUser and --ldapBindWithOSDefaults at the same time.

--ldapQueryPassword <string>

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

The password used to bind to an LDAP server when using --ldapQueryUser. You must use --ldapQueryPassword with --ldapQueryUser.

If unset, mongos will not attempt to bind to the LDAP server.

This setting can be configured on a running mongos using setParameter.

Note

Windows MongoDB deployments can use --ldapBindWithOSDefaults instead of --ldapQueryPassword and --ldapQueryPassword. You cannot specify both --ldapQueryPassword and --ldapBindWithOSDefaults at the same time.

--ldapBindWithOSDefaults <bool>

Default: False

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise for the Windows platform only.

Allows mongos to authenticate, or bind, using your Windows login credentials when connecting to the LDAP server.

Only required if:

Use --ldapBindWithOSDefaults to replace --ldapQueryUser and --ldapQueryPassword.

--ldapBindMethod <string>

Default: simple

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

The method mongos uses to authenticate to an LDAP server. Use with --ldapQueryUser and --ldapQueryPassword to connect to the LDAP server.

--ldapBindMethod supports the following values:

  • simple - mongos uses simple authentication.
  • sasl - mongos uses SASL protocol for authentication

If you specify sasl, you can configure the available SASL mechanisms using . mongos defaults to using DIGEST-MD5 mechanism.

--ldapBindSASLMechanisms <string>

Default: DIGEST-MD5

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

A comma-separated list of SASL mechanisms mongos can use when authenticating to the LDAP server. The mongos and the LDAP server must agree on at least one mechanism.

Set --ldapBindMethod to sasl to use this option.

Note

A complete list of SASL mechanisms is out of scope for this documentation. See the IANA list of SASL mechanisms, as well as the documentation for your LDAP service.

--ldapTransportSecurity <string>

Default: tls

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

By default, mongos creates a TLS/SSL secured connection to the LDAP server.

For Linux deployments, you must configure the appropriate TLS Options in /etc/openldap/ldap.conf file. Your operating system’s package manager creates this file as part of the MongoDB Enterprise installation, via the libldap dependency. See the documentation for TLS Options in the ldap.conf OpenLDAP documentation for more complete instructions.

For Windows deployment, you must add the LDAP server CA certificates to the Windows certificate management tool. The exact name and functionality of the tool may vary depending on operating system version. Please see the documentation for your version of Windows for more information on certificate management.

Set --ldapTransportSecurity to none to disable TLS/SSL between mongos and the LDAP server.

Warning

Setting --ldapTransportSecurity to none transmits plaintext information and possibly credentials between mongos and the LDAP server.

--ldapTimeoutMS <long>

Default: 10000

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

The amount of time in milliseconds mongos should wait for an LDAP server to respond to a request.

Increasing the value of --ldapTimeoutMS may prevent connection failure between the MongoDB server and the LDAP server, if the source of the failure is a connection timeout. Decreasing the value of --ldapTimeoutMS reduces the time MongoDB waits for a response from the LDAP server.

This setting can be configured on a running mongos using setParameter.

--ldapUserToDNMapping <string>

New in version 3.4: Available in MongoDB Enterprise only.

Maps the username provided to mongos for authentication to a LDAP Distinguished Name (DN). You may need to use --ldapUserToDNMapping to transform a username into an LDAP DN in the following scenarios:

  • Performing LDAP authentication with simple LDAP binding, where users authenticate to MongoDB with usernames that are not full LDAP DNs.
  • Using an LDAP authorization query template that requires a DN.
  • Transforming the usernames of clients authenticating to Mongo DB using different authentication mechanisms (e.g. x.509, kerberos) to a full LDAP DN for authorization.

--ldapUserToDNMapping expects a quote-enclosed JSON-string representing an ordered array of documents. Each document contains a regular expression match and either a substitution or ldapQuery template used for transforming the incoming username.

Each document in the array has the following form:

{
  match: "<regex>"
  substitution: "<LDAP DN>" | ldapQuery: "<LDAP Query>"
}
Field Description Example
match An ECMAScript-formatted regular expression (regex) to match against a provided username. Each parenthesis-enclosed section represents a regex capture group used by substitution or ldapQuery. "(.+)ENGINEERING" "(.+)DBA"
substitution An LDAP distinguished name (DN) formatting template that converts the authentication name matched by the match regex into a LDAP DN. Each curly bracket-enclosed numeric value is replaced by the corresponding regex capture group extracted from the authentication username via the match regex. "cn={0},ou=engineering, dc=example,dc=com"
ldapQuery A LDAP query formatting template that inserts the authentication name matched by the match regex into an LDAP query URI encoded respecting RFC4515 and RFC4516. Each curly bracket-enclosed numeric value is replaced by the corresponding regex capture group extracted from the authentication username via the match expression. mongos executes the query against the LDAP server to retrieve the LDAP DN for the authenticated user. mongos requires exactly one returned result for the transformation to be successful, or mongos skips this transformation. "ou=engineering,dc=example, dc=com??one?(user={0})"

For each document in the array, you must use either substitution or ldapQuery. You cannot specify both in the same document.

When performing authentication or authorization, mongos steps through each document in the array in the given order, checking the authentication username against the match filter. If a match is found, mongos applies the transformation and uses the output for authenticating the user. mongos does not check the remaining documents in the array.

If the given document does not match the provided authentication name, or the transformation described by the document fails, mongos continues through the list of documents to find additional matches. If no matches are found in any document, mongos returns an error.

Example

The following shows two transformation documents. The first document matches against any string ending in @ENGINEERING, placing anything preceeding the suffix into a regex capture group. The second document matches against any string ending in @DBA, placing anything preceeding the suffix into a regex capture group.

Important

You must pass the array to --ldapUserToDNMapping as a string.

"[
   {
      match: "(.+)@ENGINEERING.EXAMPLE.COM",
      substitution: "cn={0},ou=engineering,dc=example,dc=com"
   },
   {
      match: "(.+)@DBA.EXAMPLE.COM",
      ldapQuery: "ou=dba,dc=example,dc=com??one?(user={0})"

   }

]"

A user with username alice@ENGINEERING.EXAMPLE.COM matches the first document. The regex capture group {0} corresponds to the string alice. The resulting output is the DN "cn=alice,ou=engineering,dc=example,dc=com".

A user with username bob@DBA.EXAMPLE.COM matches the second document. The regex capture group {0} corresponds to the string bob. The resulting output is the LDAP query "ou=dba,dc=example,dc=com??one?(user=bob)". mongos executes this query against the LDAP server, returning the result "cn=bob,ou=dba,dc=example,dc=com".

If --ldapUserToDNMapping is unset, mongos applies no transformations to the username when attempting to authenticate or authorize a user against the LDAP server.

This setting can be configured on a running mongos using the setParameter database command.

Note

An explanation of RFC4515, RFC4516 or LDAP queries is out of scope for the MongoDB Documentation. Please review the RFC directly or use your preferred LDAP resource.

Additional Options

--ipv6

Removed in version 3.0.

Enables IPv6 support and allows mongos to connect to the MongoDB instance using an IPv6 network. Prior to MongoDB 3.0, you had to specify --ipv6 to use IPv6. In MongoDB 3.0 and later, IPv6 is always enabled.

--jsonp

Permits JSONP access via an HTTP interface. Enabling the interface can increase network exposure. The --jsonp option enables the HTTP interface, even if the HTTP interface option is disabled.

Deprecated since version 3.2: HTTP interface for MongoDB

--noscripting

Disables the scripting engine.

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