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mongoimport

macOS Sierra and Go 1.6 Incompatibility

Users running on macOS Sierra require the 3.2.10 or newer version of mongoimport.

Synopsis

The mongoimport tool imports content from an Extended JSON, CSV, or TSV export created by mongoexport, or potentially, another third-party export tool.

See the mongoexport document for more information regarding mongoexport, which provides the inverse “exporting” capability.

Run mongoimport from the system command line, not the mongo shell.

Availability

The mongoimport tool is part of the MongoDB tools package. Consult the installation guide for your platform for instructions on how to install the tools package as part of your MongoDB installation.

The tools package is also available from the MongoDB Download Center, either as a separate tools download, or contained within the TGZ or ZIP downloads, depending on platform. On Windows, the MSI installer includes all tools as part of the default installation.

Tip

If downloading the TGZ or ZIP files from the Download Center, you may want to update your PATH environment variable to include the directory where you installed these tools. See the installation guide for your platform for more information.

Behavior

Warning

Avoid using mongoimport and mongoexport for full instance production backups. They do not reliably preserve all rich BSON data types, because JSON can only represent a subset of the types supported by BSON. Use mongodump and mongorestore as described in MongoDB Backup Methods for this kind of functionality.

JSON Format

Starting in MongoDB 4.2, mongoimport expects import data to be in Extended JSON v2.0 (either Relaxed or Canonical mode) by default. To recognize data that is in Extended JSON v1.0 format, see --legacy.

In earlier versions, mongoimport expects data in MongoDB Extended JSON (v1) format.

Tip

In general, the versions of mongoexport and mongoimport should match. That is, to import data created from mongoexport, you should use the corresponding version of mongoimport.

Encoding

mongoimport only supports data files that are UTF-8 encoded. Using other encodings will produce errors.

FIPS

Starting in version 4.2, MongoDB removes the --sslFIPSMode option for mongoimport. mongoimport will use FIPS compliant connections to mongod/mongos if the mongod/mongos instances are configured to use FIPS mode.

Write Concern

Starting in version 4.2, if you specify write concern in both the --writeConcern option and the --uri connection string option, the --writeConcern value overrides the write concern specified in the URI string.

In earlier versions, the two options are incompatible.

Batches

Starting in MongoDB 4.2, mongoimport uses maximum batch size of 100,000 to perform bulk insert/upsert operations.

Required Access

In order to connect to a mongod that enforces authorization with the --auth option, you must use the --username and --password options. The connecting user must possess, at a minimum, the readWrite role on the database into which they are importing data.

Options

Changed in version 3.0.0: mongoimport removed the --dbpath as well as related --directoryperdb and --journal options. To use mongoimport, you must run mongoimport against a running mongod or mongos instance as appropriate.

mongoimport
--help

Returns information on the options and use of mongoimport.

--verbose, -v

Increases the amount of internal reporting returned on standard output or in log files. Increase the verbosity with the -v form by including the option multiple times, (e.g. -vvvvv.)

--quiet

Runs mongoimport in a quiet mode that attempts to limit the amount of output.

This option suppresses:

  • output from database commands
  • replication activity
  • connection accepted events
  • connection closed events
--version

Returns the mongoimport release number.

--uri=<connectionString>

New in version 3.4.6.

Specify a resolvable URI connection string (enclose in quotes) to connect to the MongoDB deployment.

--uri "mongodb://[username:password@]host1[:port1][,host2[:port2],...[,hostN[:portN]]][/[database][?options]]"

For information on the components of the connection string, see the Connection String URI Format documentation.

Note

For TLS/SSL options, use the command-line options instead of the URI options for TLS/SSL (Available starting in 4.2).

Important

The following command-line options cannot be used in conjunction with --uri option:

Instead, specify these options as part of your --uri connection string.

--host=<hostname><:port>, -h=<hostname><:port>

Default: localhost:27017

Specifies a resolvable hostname for the mongod to which to connect. By default, the mongoimport attempts to connect to a MongoDB instance running on the localhost on port number 27017.

To connect to a replica set, specify the replSetName and a seed list of set members, as in the following:

--host=<replSetName>/<hostname1><:port>,<hostname2><:port>,<...>

When specifying the replica set list format, mongoimport always connects to the primary.

You can also connect to any single member of the replica set by specifying the host and port of only that member:

--host=<hostname1><:port>

Changed in version 3.0.0: If you use IPv6 and use the <address>:<port> format, you must enclose the portion of an address and port combination in brackets (e.g. [<address>]).

Note

You cannot specify both --host and --uri.

--port=<port>

Default: 27017

Specifies the TCP port on which the MongoDB instance listens for client connections.

Note

You cannot specify both --port and --uri.

--ipv6

Removed in version 3.0.

Enables IPv6 support and allows mongoimport to connect to the MongoDB instance using an IPv6 network. Prior to MongoDB 3.0, you had to specify --ipv6 to use IPv6. In MongoDB 3.0 and later, IPv6 is always enabled.

--ssl

New in version 2.6.

Enables connection to a mongod or mongos that has TLS/SSL support enabled.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients .

--sslCAFile=<filename>

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the .pem file that contains the root certificate chain from the Certificate Authority. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

Starting in version 3.4, if --tlsCAFile/net.tls.CAFile (or their aliases --sslCAFile/net.ssl.CAFile) is not specified and you are not using x.509 authentication, the system-wide CA certificate store will be used when connecting to an TLS/SSL-enabled server.

To use x.509 authentication, --tlsCAFile or net.tls.CAFile must be specified unless using --tlsCertificateSelector or --net.tls.certificateSelector. Or if using the ssl aliases, --sslCAFile or net.ssl.CAFile must be specified unless using --sslCertificateSelector or net.ssl.certificateSelector.

Warning

Version 3.2 and earlier: For TLS/SSL connections (--ssl) to mongod and mongos, if the mongoimport runs without the --sslCAFile, mongoimport will not attempt to validate the server certificates. This creates a vulnerability to expired mongod and mongos certificates as well as to foreign processes posing as valid mongod or mongos instances. Ensure that you always specify the CA file to validate the server certificates in cases where intrusion is a possibility.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients .

--sslPEMKeyFile=<filename>

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the .pem file that contains both the TLS/SSL certificate and key. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

This option is required when using the --ssl option to connect to a mongod or mongos that has CAFile enabled without allowConnectionsWithoutCertificates.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients .

--sslPEMKeyPassword=<value>

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the password to de-crypt the certificate-key file (i.e. --sslPEMKeyFile). Use the --sslPEMKeyPassword option only if the certificate-key file is encrypted. In all cases, the mongoimport will redact the password from all logging and reporting output.

If the private key in the PEM file is encrypted and you do not specify the --sslPEMKeyPassword option, the mongoimport will prompt for a passphrase. See TLS/SSL Certificate Passphrase.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients .

--sslCRLFile=<filename>

New in version 2.6.

Specifies the .pem file that contains the Certificate Revocation List. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients .

--sslAllowInvalidCertificates

New in version 2.6.

Bypasses the validation checks for server certificates and allows the use of invalid certificates. When using the allowInvalidCertificates setting, MongoDB logs as a warning the use of the invalid certificate.

Starting in MongoDB 4.0, if you specify --sslAllowInvalidCertificates or net.ssl.allowInvalidCertificates: true (or in MongoDB 4.2, the alias --tlsAllowInvalidateCertificates or net.tls.allowInvalidCertificates: true) when using x.509 authentication, an invalid certificate is only sufficient to establish a TLS/SSL connection but is insufficient for authentication.

Warning

Although available, avoid using the --sslAllowInvalidCertificates option if possible. If the use of --sslAllowInvalidCertificates is necessary, only use the option on systems where intrusion is not possible.

If the mongo shell (and other MongoDB Tools) runs with the --sslAllowInvalidCertificates option, the mongo shell (and other MongoDB Tools) will not attempt to validate the server certificates. This creates a vulnerability to expired mongod and mongos certificates as well as to foreign processes posing as valid mongod or mongos instances. If you only need to disable the validation of the hostname in the TLS/SSL certificates, see --sslAllowInvalidHostnames.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients .

--sslAllowInvalidHostnames

New in version 3.0.

Disables the validation of the hostnames in TLS/SSL certificates. Allows mongoimport to connect to MongoDB instances even if the hostname in their certificates do not match the specified hostname.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients .

--username=<username>, -u=<username>

Specifies a username with which to authenticate to a MongoDB database that uses authentication. Use in conjunction with the --password and --authenticationDatabase options.

Note

You cannot specify both --username and --uri.

--password=<password>, -p=<password>

Specifies a password with which to authenticate to a MongoDB database that uses authentication. Use in conjunction with the --username and --authenticationDatabase options.

Changed in version 3.0.2: To prompt the user for the password, pass the --username option without --password or specify an empty string as the --password value, as in --password "" .

Note

You cannot specify both --password and --uri.

--authenticationDatabase=<dbname>

Specifies the authentication database where the specified --username has been created. See Authentication Database.

Note

You cannot specify both --authenticationDatabase and --uri.

--authenticationMechanism=<name>

Default: SCRAM-SHA-1

Specifies the authentication mechanism the mongoimport instance uses to authenticate to the mongod or mongos.

Changed in version 4.0: MongoDB removes support for the deprecated MongoDB Challenge-Response (MONGODB-CR) authentication mechanism.

MongoDB adds support for SCRAM mechanism using the SHA-256 hash function (SCRAM-SHA-256).

Value Description
SCRAM-SHA-1 RFC 5802 standard Salted Challenge Response Authentication Mechanism using the SHA-1 hash function.
SCRAM-SHA-256

RFC 7677 standard Salted Challenge Response Authentication Mechanism using the SHA-256 hash function.

Requires featureCompatibilityVersion set to 4.0.

New in version 4.0.

MONGODB-X509 MongoDB TLS/SSL certificate authentication.
GSSAPI (Kerberos) External authentication using Kerberos. This mechanism is available only in MongoDB Enterprise.
PLAIN (LDAP SASL) External authentication using LDAP. You can also use PLAIN for authenticating in-database users. PLAIN transmits passwords in plain text. This mechanism is available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

Note

You cannot specify both --authenticationMechanism and --uri.

--gssapiServiceName=<serviceName>

New in version 2.6.

Specify the name of the service using GSSAPI/Kerberos. Only required if the service does not use the default name of mongodb.

This option is available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

--gssapiHostName=<hostname>

New in version 2.6.

Specify the hostname of a service using GSSAPI/Kerberos. Only required if the hostname of a machine does not match the hostname resolved by DNS.

This option is available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

--db=<database>, -d=<database>

Specifies the name of the database on which to run the mongoimport.

Note

You cannot specify both --db and --uri.

--collection=<collection>, -c=<collection>

Specifies the collection to import.

New in version 2.6: If you do not specify --collection, mongoimport takes the collection name from the input filename. MongoDB omits the extension of the file from the collection name, if the input file has an extension.

--fields=<field1[,field2]>, -f=<field1[,field2]>

Specify a comma separated list of field names when importing csv or tsv files that do not have field names in the first (i.e. header) line of the file.

To also specify the field type as well as the field name, use --fields with --columnsHaveTypes.

If you attempt to include --fields when importing JSON data, mongoimport will return an error. --fields is only for csv or tsv imports.

--fieldFile=<filename>

As an alternative to --fields, the --fieldFile option allows you to specify a file that holds a list of field names if your csv or tsv file does not include field names in the first line of the file (i.e. header). Place one field per line.

To also specify the field type as well as the field name, use --fieldFile with --columnsHaveTypes.

If you attempt to include --fieldFile when importing JSON data, mongoimport will return an error. --fieldFile is only for csv or tsv imports.

--ignoreBlanks

Ignores empty fields in csv and tsv exports. If not specified, mongoimport creates fields without values in imported documents.

If you attempt to include --ignoreBlanks when importing JSON data, mongoimport will return an error. --ignoreBlanks is only for csv or tsv imports.

--type=<json|csv|tsv>

Specifies the file type to import. The default format is JSON, but it’s possible to import csv and tsv files.

The csv parser accepts that data that complies with RFC RFC 4180. As a result, backslashes are not a valid escape character. If you use double-quotes to enclose fields in the CSV data, you must escape internal double-quote marks by prepending another double-quote.

--file=<filename>

Specifies the location and name of a file containing the data to import. If you do not specify a file, mongoimport reads data from standard input (e.g. “stdin”).

--drop

Modifies the import process so that the target instance drops the collection before importing the data from the input.

--headerline

If using --type csv or --type tsv, uses the first line as field names. Otherwise, mongoimport will import the first line as a distinct document.

If you attempt to include --headerline when importing JSON data, mongoimport will return an error. --headerline is only for csv or tsv imports.

--mode=<insert|upsert|merge>

Default: insert

New in version 3.4.

Specifies how the import process should handle existing documents in the database that match documents in the import file.

By default, mongoimport uses the _id field to match documents in the collection with documents in the import file. To specify the fields against which to match existing documents for the upsert and merge modes, use --upsertFields.

Value Description
insert Insert the documents in the import file. mongoimport will log an error if you attempt to import a document that contains a duplicate value for a field with a unique index, such as _id.
upsert Replace existing documents in the database with matching documents from the import file. mongoimport will insert all other documents. Replace Matching Documents during Import describes how to use --mode upsert.
merge Merge existing documents that match a document in the import file with the new document. mongoimport will insert all other documents. Merge Matching Documents during Import describes how to use --mode merge.
--upsertFields=<field1[,field2]>

Specifies a list of fields for the query portion of the upsert. Use this option if the _id fields in the existing documents don’t match the field in the document, but another field or field combination can uniquely identify documents as a basis for performing upsert operations.

Changed in version 3.4: Modifies the import process to update existing objects in the database if they match based on the specified fields, while inserting all other objects. You do not need to use --mode upsert with --upsertFields.

If you do not specify a field, --upsertFields will upsert on the basis of the _id field.

To ensure adequate performance, indexes should exist for this field or fields.

--stopOnError

Forces mongoimport to halt the insert operation at the first error rather than continuing the operation despite errors.

Starting in version 4.2, mongoimport, by default, continues when it encounters duplicate key and document validation errors. To ensure that the program stops on these errors, specify --stopOnError.

--jsonArray

Accepts the import of data expressed with multiple MongoDB documents within a single JSON array. Limited to imports of 16 MB or smaller.

Use --jsonArray in conjunction with mongoexport --jsonArray.

--legacy

Indicates that the import data is in Extended JSON v1 format instead of the default Extended JSON v2 format.

Tip

In general, the versions of mongoexport and mongoimport should match. That is, to import data created from mongoexport, you should use the corresponding version of mongoimport.

For example, if the import data is in v1 format:

{"_id":1.0,"myregfield":{"$regex":"foo","$options":"i"}}

Import without the --legacy option results in the following document in the collection:

{ "_id" : 1, "myregfield" : { "$regex" : "foo", "$options" : "i" } }

Import with the --legacy results in the following document in the collection:

{ "_id" : 1, "myregfield" : { "$regularExpression" : { "pattern" : "foo", "options" : "i" } } }

New in version 4.2.

--maintainInsertionOrder

Default: False

If specified,

  • Starting in version 4.2, mongoimport inserts the documents in the order of their appearance in the input source. That is, both the bulk write batch order and document order within the batches are maintained.
  • In earlier versions, only the batch order is maintained; document order within batches are not maintained.

Starting in MongoDB 4.2, specifying --maintainInsertionOrder also enables --stopOnError and sets numInsertionWorkers to 1.

If unspecified, mongoimport may perform the insertions in an arbitrary order.

--numInsertionWorkers=<int>

Default: 1

New in version 3.0.0.

Specifies the number of insertion workers to run concurrently.

For large imports, increasing the number of insertion workers may increase the speed of the import.

--writeConcern=<document>

Default: majority

Specifies the write concern for each write operation that mongoimport performs.

Specify the write concern as a document with w options:

--writeConcern "{w:'majority'}"

If the write concern is also included in the --uri connection string, the command-line --writeConcern overrides the write concern specified in the URI string.

--bypassDocumentValidation

Enables mongoimport to bypass document validation during the operation. This lets you insert documents that do not meet the validation requirements.

New in version 3.2.1.

--columnsHaveTypes

New in version 3.4.

Instructs mongoimport that the field list specified in --fields, --fieldFile, or --headerline specifies the types of each field.

Field names must be in the form of <colName>.<type>(<arg>). You must backslash-escape the following characters if you wish to include them in an argument: (, ), and \.

type Supported Arguments Example Header Field
auto() None. misc.auto()
binary(<arg>)
  • base32 (RFC4648 encoding schema)
  • base64 (RFC4648 encoding schema)
  • hex
user thumbnail.binary(base64)
boolean() None. verified.boolean()
date(<arg>) Alias for date_go(<arg>). Go Language time.Parse format. created.date(2006-01-02 15:04:05)
date_go(<arg>) Go Language time.Parse format created.date_go(2006-01-02 15:04:05)
date_ms(<arg>) Microsoft SQL Server FORMAT format created.date_ms(yyyy-MM-dd H:mm:ss)
date_oracle(<arg>) Oracle Database TO_DATE format. created.date_oracle(YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS)
decimal() None price.decimal()
double() None. revenue.double()
int32() None. followerCount.int32()
int64() None. bigNumber.int64()
string() None. zipcode.string()

See Import CSV with Specified Field Types for sample usage.

If you attempt to include --columnsHaveTypes when importing JSON data, mongoimport will return an error. --columnsHaveTypes is only for csv or tsv imports.

--parseGrace=<grace>

Default: stop

New in version 3.4.

Specifies how mongoimport handles type coercion failures when importing CSV or TSV files with --columnsHaveTypes.

--parseGrace has no effect when importing JSON documents.

Value Description
autoCast Assigns a type based on the value of the field. For example, if a field is defined as a double and the value for that field was "foo", mongoimport would make that field value a string type.
skipField For the row being imported, mongoimport does not include the field whose type does not match the expected type.
skipRow mongoimport does not import rows containing a value whose type does not match the expected type.
stop mongoimport returns an error that ends the import.

Examples

Simple Import

mongoimport restores a database from a backup taken with mongoexport. Most of the arguments to mongoexport also exist for mongoimport.

In the following example, mongoimport imports the JSON data from the contacts.json file into the collection contacts in the users database.

mongoimport --db=users --collection=contacts --file=contacts.json

Replace Matching Documents during Import

Changed in version 3.4: In MongoDB 3.4, --mode upsert replaces the deprecated --upsert option.

With --mode upsert, mongoimport replaces existing documents in the database that match a document in the import file with the document from the import file. Documents that do not match an existing document in the database are inserted as usual. By default mongoimport matches documents based on the _id field. Use --upsertFields to specify the fields to match against.

Consider the following document in the people collection in the example database:

{
   "_id" : ObjectId("580100f4da893943d393e909"),
   "name" : "Crystal Duncan",
   "region" : "United States",
   "email" : "crystal@example.com"
}

The following document exists in a people-20160927.json JSON file. The _id field of the JSON object matches the _id field of the document in the people collection.

{
   "_id" : ObjectId("580100f4da893943d393e909"),
   "username" : "crystal",
   "likes" : [ "running", "pandas", "software development" ]
}

To import the people-20160927.json file and replace documents in the database that match the documents in the import file, specify --mode upsert, as in the following:

mongoimport -c=people -d=example --mode=upsert --file=people-20160927.json

The document in the people collection would then contain only the fields from the imported document, as in the following:

{
   "_id" : ObjectId("580100f4da893943d393e909"),
   "username" : "crystal",
   "likes" : [ "running", "pandas", "software development" ]
}

Merge Matching Documents during Import

New in version 3.4.

With --mode merge, mongoimport enables you to merge fields from a new record with an existing document in the database. Documents that do not match an existing document in the database are inserted as usual. By default mongoimport matches documents based on the _id field. Use --upsertFields to specify the fields to match against.

The people collection in the example database contains the following document:

{
   "_id" : ObjectId("580100f4da893943d393e909"),
   "name" : "Crystal Duncan",
   "region" : "United States",
   "email" : "crystal@example.com"
}

The following document exists in a people-20160927.json JSON file. The _id field of the JSON object matches the _id field of the document in the people collection.

{
   "_id" : ObjectId("580100f4da893943d393e909"),
   "username" : "crystal",
   "email": "crystal.duncan@example.com",
   "likes" : [ "running", "pandas", "software development" ]
}

To import the people-20160927.json file and merge documents from the import file with matching documents in the database, specify --mode merge, as in the following:

mongoimport -c=people -d=example --mode=merge --file=people-20160927.json

The import operation combines the fields from the JSON file with the original document in the database, matching the documents based on the _id field. During the import process, mongoimport adds the new username and likes fields to the document and updates the email field with the value from the imported document, as in the following:

{
   "_id" : ObjectId("580100f4da893943d393e909"),
   "name" : "Crystal Duncan",
   "region" : "United States",
   "email" : "crystal.duncan@example.com",
   "username" : "crystal",
   "likes" : [
      "running",
      "pandas",
      "software development"
   ]
}

Import JSON to Remote Host Running with Authentication

In the following example, mongoimport imports data from the file /opt/backups/mdb1-examplenet.json into the contacts collection within the database marketing on a remote MongoDB database with authentication enabled.

mongoimport connects to the mongod instance running on the host mongodb1.example.net over port 37017. It authenticates with the username user; the example omits the --password option to have mongoimport prompt for the password:

mongoimport --host=mongodb1.example.net --port=37017 --username=user --collection=contacts --db=marketing --file=/opt/backups/mdb1-examplenet.json

CSV Import

General CSV Import

In the following example, mongoimport imports the csv formatted data in the /opt/backups/contacts.csv file into the collection contacts in the users database on the MongoDB instance running on the localhost port numbered 27017.

Specifying --headerline instructs mongoimport to determine the name of the fields using the first line in the CSV file.

mongoimport --db=users --collection=contacts --type=csv --headerline --file=/opt/backups/contacts.csv

mongoimport uses the input file name, without the extension, as the collection name if -c or --collection is unspecified. The following example is therefore equivalent:

mongoimport --db=users --type=csv --headerline --file=/opt/backups/contacts.csv

Import CSV with Specified Field Types

New in version 3.4.

Starting in MongoDB 3.4, when you specify the field name, you can also specify the data type. To specify field names and type, include --columnsHaveTypes with either: --fields, --fieldFile, or --headerline.

Specify field names and data types in the form <colName>.<type>(<arg>).

For example, a /example/file.csv file contains the following data:

Katherine Gray, 1996-02-03, false, 1235, 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
Albert Gilbert, 1992-04-24, true, 13, 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

The following operation uses mongoimport with the --fields and --columnsHaveTypes option to specify both the field names and the BSON types of the imported CSV data.

mongoimport --db=users --collection=contacts --type=csv \
   --columnsHaveTypes \
   --fields="name.string(),birthdate.date(2006-01-02),contacted.boolean(),followerCount.int32(),thumbnail.binary(base64)" \
   --file=/example/file.csv

Ignore Blank Fields

Use the --ignoreBlanks option to ignore blank fields. For CSV and TSV imports, this option provides the desired functionality in most cases because it avoids inserting fields with null values into your collection.

The following example imports the data from data.csv, skipping any blank fields:

mongoimport --db=users --collection=contacts --type=csv --file=/example/data.csv --ignoreBlanks
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