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mongostat

Synopsis

The mongostat utility provides a quick overview of the status of a currently running mongod or mongos instance. mongostat is functionally similar to the UNIX/Linux file system utility vmstat, but provides data regarding mongod and mongos instances.

Run mongostat from the system command line, not the mongo shell.

Versioning

Starting with MongoDB 4.4, mongostat is now released separately from the MongoDB Server and uses its own versioning, with an initial version of 100.0.0. Previously, mongostat was released alongside the MongoDB Server and used matching versioning.

For documentation on the MongoDB 4.2 or earlier versions of mongostat, reference the MongoDB Server Documentation for that version of the tool:

This documentation is for version 100.1.1 of mongostat.

Compatibility

MongoDB Server Compatibility

mongostat version 100.1.1 supports the following versions of the MongoDB Server:

  • MongoDB 4.4
  • MongoDB 4.2
  • MongoDB 4.0
  • MongoDB 3.6

While mongostat may work on earlier versions of MongoDB server, any such compatibility is not guaranteed.

Platform Support

mongostat version 100.1.1 is supported on the following platforms:

  x86_64 ARM64 PPC64LE s390x
Amazon 2      
Amazon 2013.03+      
Debian 10      
Debian 9      
Debian 8      
RHEL / CentOS 8    
RHEL / CentOS 7  
RHEL / CentOS 6    
SUSE 12      
Ubuntu 20      
Ubuntu 18
Ubuntu 16
Windows 8 and later      
Windows Server 2012 and later      
macOS 10.12 or later      

Installation

The mongostat tool is part of the MongoDB Database Tools package:

➤ Follow the Database Tools Installation Guide to install mongostat.

Syntax

The mongostat command has the following form:

mongostat <options> <connection-string> <polling interval in seconds>

Run mongostat from the system command line, not the mongo shell.

Required Access

In order to connect to a mongod that enforces authorization with the --auth option, specify the --username and --password options, and the connecting user must have the serverStatus privilege action on the cluster resources.

The built-in role clusterMonitor provides this privilege as well as other privileges. To create a role with just the privilege to run mongostat, see Create a Role to Run mongostat.

Behavior

FIPS

mongostat automatically creates FIPS-compliant connections to a mongod/mongos that is configured to use FIPS mode.

Options

mongostat
--help

Returns information on the options and use of mongostat.

--verbose, -v

Increases the amount of internal reporting returned on standard output or in log files. Increase the verbosity with the -v form by including the option multiple times, (e.g. -vvvvv.)

--version

Returns the mongostat release number.

--uri=<connectionString>

Specifies the resolvable URI connection string of the MongoDB deployment, enclosed in quotes:

--uri="mongodb://[username:password@]host1[:port1][,host2[:port2],...[,hostN[:portN]]][/[database][?options]]"

Starting with version 100.0 of mongostat, the connection string may alternatively be provided as a positional parameter, without using the --uri option:

mongostat mongodb://[username:password@]host1[:port1][,host2[:port2],...[,hostN[:portN]]][/[database][?options]]

As a positional parameter, the connection string may be specified at any point on the command line, as long as it begins with either mongodb:// or mongodb+srv://. For example:

mongostat --username joe --password secret1 mongodb://mongodb0.example.com:27017 --ssl

Only one connection string can be provided. Attempting to include more than one, whether using the --uri option or as a positional argument, will result in an error.

For information on the components of the connection string, see the Connection String URI Format documentation.

Note

Some components in the connection string may alternatively be specified using their own explicit command-line options, such as --username and --password. Providing a connection string while also using an explicit option and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

--host=<hostname><:port>, -h=<hostname><:port>

Default: localhost:27017

Specifies the resolvable hostname of the MongoDB deployment. By default, mongostat attempts to connect to a MongoDB instance running on the localhost on port number 27017.

To connect to a replica set, you can specify the set member or members to report on, as in the following (see also the --discover flag):

--host=<hostname1><:port>,<hostname2><:port>,<...>

If you use IPv6 and use the <address>:<port> format, you must enclose the portion of an address and port combination in brackets (e.g. [<address>]).

Alternatively, you can also specify the hostname directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --host and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

--port=<port>

Default: 27017

Specifies the TCP port on which the MongoDB instance listens for client connections.

Alternatively, you can also specify the port directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --port and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

--ssl

Enables connection to a mongod or mongos that has TLS/SSL support enabled.

Alternatively, you can also configure TLS/SSL support directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --ssl and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients.

--sslCAFile=<filename>

Specifies the .pem file that contains the root certificate chain from the Certificate Authority. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

Alternatively, you can also specify the .pem file directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --sslCAFile and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients.

--sslPEMKeyFile=<filename>

Specifies the .pem file that contains both the TLS/SSL certificate and key. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

This option is required when using the --ssl option to connect to a mongod or mongos that has CAFile enabled without allowConnectionsWithoutCertificates.

Alternatively, you can also specify the .pem file directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --sslPEMKeyFile and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients.

--sslPEMKeyPassword=<value>

Specifies the password to de-crypt the certificate-key file (i.e. --sslPEMKeyFile). Use the --sslPEMKeyPassword option only if the certificate-key file is encrypted. In all cases, the mongostat will redact the password from all logging and reporting output.

If the private key in the PEM file is encrypted and you do not specify the --sslPEMKeyPassword option, the mongostat will prompt for a passphrase. See TLS/SSL Certificate Passphrase.

Alternatively, you can also specify the password directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --sslPEMKeyPassword and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients.

--sslCRLFile=<filename>

Specifies the .pem file that contains the Certificate Revocation List. Specify the file name of the .pem file using relative or absolute paths.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients.

--sslAllowInvalidCertificates

Bypasses the validation checks for server certificates and allows the use of invalid certificates. When using the allowInvalidCertificates setting, MongoDB logs as a warning the use of the invalid certificate.

Warning

Although available, avoid using the --sslAllowInvalidCertificates option if possible. If the use of --sslAllowInvalidCertificates is necessary, only use the option on systems where intrusion is not possible.

Connecting to a mongod or mongos instance without validating server certificates is a potential security risk. If you only need to disable the validation of the hostname in the TLS/SSL certificates, see --sslAllowInvalidHostnames.

Alternatively, you can also disable certificate validation directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --sslAllowInvalidCertificates and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients.

--sslAllowInvalidHostnames

Disables the validation of the hostnames in TLS/SSL certificates. Allows mongostat to connect to MongoDB instances even if the hostname in their certificates do not match the specified hostname.

Alternatively, you can also disable hostname validation directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --sslAllowInvalidHostnames and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

For more information about TLS/SSL and MongoDB, see Configure mongod and mongos for TLS/SSL and TLS/SSL Configuration for Clients.

--username=<username>, -u=<username>

Specifies a username with which to authenticate to a MongoDB database that uses authentication. Use in conjunction with the --password and --authenticationDatabase options.

Alternatively, you can also specify the username directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --username and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

If connecting to a MongoDB Atlas cluster using the MONGODB-AWS authentication mechanism, you can specify your AWS access key ID in:

See Connect to a MongoDB Atlas Cluster using AWS IAM Credentials for an example of each.

--password=<password>, -p=<password>

Specifies a password with which to authenticate to a MongoDB database that uses authentication. Use in conjunction with the --username and --authenticationDatabase options.

To prompt the user for the password, pass the --username option without --password or specify an empty string as the --password value, as in --password="" .

Alternatively, you can also specify the password directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --password and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

If connecting to a MongoDB Atlas cluster using the MONGODB-AWS authentication mechanism, you can specify your AWS secret access key in:

  • this field,
  • the connection string, or
  • the AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY environment variable.

See Connect to a MongoDB Atlas Cluster using AWS IAM Credentials for an example of each.

--awsSessionToken=<AWS Session Token>

If connecting to a MongoDB Atlas cluster using the MONGODB-AWS authentication mechanism, and using session tokens in addition to your AWS access key ID and secret access key, you can specify your AWS session token in:

See Connect to a MongoDB Atlas Cluster using AWS IAM Credentials for an example of each.

Only valid when using the MONGODB-AWS authentication mechanism.

--authenticationDatabase=<dbname>

Specifies the authentication database where the specified --username has been created. See Authentication Database.

--authenticationDatabase is required for mongod and mongos instances that use Authentication.

If using the GSSAPI (Kerberos), PLAIN (LDAP SASL), or MONGODB-AWS authentication mechanisms, you must set --authenticationDatabase to $external.

Alternatively, you can also specify the authentication database directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --authenticationDatabase and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

--authenticationMechanism=<name>

Default: SCRAM-SHA-1

Specifies the authentication mechanism the mongostat instance uses to authenticate to the mongod or mongos.

Changed in version 100.1.0: Starting in version 100.1.0, mongostat adds support for the MONGODB-AWS authentication mechanism when connecting to a MongoDB Atlas cluster.

Value Description
SCRAM-SHA-1 RFC 5802 standard Salted Challenge Response Authentication Mechanism using the SHA-1 hash function.
SCRAM-SHA-256

RFC 7677 standard Salted Challenge Response Authentication Mechanism using the SHA-256 hash function.

Requires featureCompatibilityVersion set to 4.0.

MONGODB-X509 MongoDB TLS/SSL certificate authentication.
MONGODB-AWS

External authentication using AWS IAM credentials for use in connecting to a MongoDB Atlas cluster. See Connect to a MongoDB Atlas Cluster using AWS IAM Credentials.

New in version 100.1.0.

GSSAPI (Kerberos) External authentication using Kerberos. This mechanism is available only in MongoDB Enterprise.
PLAIN (LDAP SASL) External authentication using LDAP. You can also use PLAIN for authenticating in-database users. PLAIN transmits passwords in plain text. This mechanism is available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

Alternatively, you can also specify the authentication mechanism directly in the URI connection string. Providing a connection string while also using --authenticationMechanism and specifying conflicting information will result in an error.

--gssapiServiceName=<string>

Specify the name of the service using GSSAPI/Kerberos. Only required if the service does not use the default name of mongodb.

This option is available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

--gssapiHostName=<string>

Specify the hostname of a service using GSSAPI/Kerberos. Only required if the hostname of a machine does not match the hostname resolved by DNS.

This option is available only in MongoDB Enterprise.

--humanReadable=<boolean>

Default: true

When true, mongostat formats dates and quantity values for easier reading, as in the following sample output:

insert query update delete getmore command dirty used flushes vsize  res qrw arw net_in net_out conn                time
   991    *0     *0     *0       0     2|0  3.4% 4.5%       0 2.90G 297M 0|0 0|0  12.9m   84.2k    2 Oct  6 09:45:37.478
   989    *0     *0     *0       0     2|0  3.6% 4.7%       0 2.91G 310M 0|0 0|0  12.9m   84.1k    2 Oct  6 09:45:38.476
   988    *0     *0     *0       0     1|0  3.7% 4.8%       0 2.92G 323M 0|0 0|0  12.8m   83.8k    2 Oct  6 09:45:39.481
   976    *0     *0     *0       0     2|0  3.9% 5.0%       0 2.94G 335M 0|0 0|0  12.7m   83.7k    2 Oct  6 09:45:40.476

When false, mongostat returns the raw data, as in the following sample output:

insert query update delete getmore command dirty used flushes      vsize       res qrw arw   net_in net_out conn                      time
   992    *0     *0     *0       0     2|0   1.3  2.4       0 2941255680 149946368 0|0 0|0 12913607   84271    2 2016-10-06T09:45:25-04:00
   989    *0     *0     *0       0     1|0   1.5  2.6       0 2974810112 163577856 0|0 0|0 12873225   84087    2 2016-10-06T09:45:26-04:00
   996    *0     *0     *0       0     1|0   1.6  2.8       0 2972712960 177209344 0|0 0|0 12955423   84345    2 2016-10-06T09:45:27-04:00
   987    *0     *0     *0       0     1|0   1.8  2.9       0 2989490176 190840832 0|0 0|0 12861852   84008    2 2016-10-06T09:45:28-04:00
-o=<field list>

When specified, mongostat includes only the specified fields in the mongostat output.

Use dot notation to specify serverStatus fields, as in metrics.document.inserted.

To specify a custom name for a field, use <field>=<customName>, as in:

mongostat -o='host=H,time=T,version=MongoDB Version'

-o supports the following methods to modify the information returned for a given serverStatus field:

rate()

Use .rate() to view the rate per second at which a serverStatus field is changing from mongostat call to call.

View Rate of Change for a Field with .rate() illustrates how to use mongostat with -o and the .rate() method.

diff()

Use .diff() to view how much a serverStatus field has changed since the previous mongostat call. The interval between calls is specified by <sleeptime>.

View Field Changes with .diff() illustrates how to use mongostat with -o and the .diff() method.

mongostat supports specifying either -o or -O: you cannot include both options.

See Specify mongostat Output Fields for an example of -o.

-O=<field list>

When specified, mongostat includes the specified serverStatus fields after the default mongostat output.

Use dot notation to specify serverStatus fields, as in metrics.document.inserted.

To specify a custom name for a field, use <field>=<customName>, as in:

mongostat -O=host=H,time=T

mongostat supports specifying either -O or -o: you cannot include both options.

See Add Fields to mongostat Output for an example of -O.

--noheaders

Disables the output of column or field names.

--rowcount=<number>, -n=<number>

Controls the number of rows to output. Use in conjunction with the sleeptime argument to control the duration of a mongostat operation.

Unless --rowcount is specified, mongostat will return an infinite number of rows (e.g. value of 0.)

--discover

Discovers and reports on statistics from all members of a replica set or sharded cluster. When connected to any member of a replica set, --discover all non-hidden members of the replica set. When connected to a mongos, mongostat will return data from all shards in the cluster. If a replica set provides a shard in the sharded cluster, mongostat will report on non-hidden members of that replica set.

The mongostat --host option is not required but potentially useful in this case.

When running with --discover, mongostat respects --rowcount.

--all

Configures mongostat to return all optional fields.

--json

Returns output for mongostat in JSON format.

--interactive

Display mongostat output in an interactive non-scrolling interface rather than the default scrolling output.

--interactive is not available with the --json option.

See: View Statistics in an Interactive Interface for an example of --interactive.

<sleeptime>

Default: 1

The final mongostat argument is the length of time, in seconds, that mongostat waits in between calls. By default mongostat returns one call every second.

mongostat returns values that reflect the operations over a 1 second period. For values of <sleeptime> greater than 1, mongostat averages data to reflect average operations per second.

Fields

mongostat returns values that reflect the operations over a 1 second period. When mongostat <sleeptime> has a value greater than 1, mongostat averages the statistics to reflect average operations per second.

mongostat outputs the following fields:

inserts

The number of objects inserted into the database per second. If followed by an asterisk (e.g. *), the datum refers to a replicated operation.

query

The number of query operations per second.

update

The number of update operations per second.

delete

The number of delete operations per second.

getmore

The number of get more (i.e. cursor batch) operations per second.

command

The number of commands per second. On secondary systems, mongostat presents two values separated by a pipe character (e.g. |), in the form of local|replicated commands.

flushes

For the WiredTiger Storage Engine, flushes refers to the number of WiredTiger checkpoints triggered between each polling interval.

dirty

Only for WiredTiger Storage Engine. The percentage of the WiredTiger cache with dirty bytes, calculated by wiredTiger.cache.tracked dirty bytes in the cache / wiredTiger.cache.maximum bytes configured.

used

Only for WiredTiger Storage Engine. The percentage of the WiredTiger cache that is in use, calculated by wiredTiger.cache.bytes currently in the cache / wiredTiger.cache.maximum bytes configured.

vsize

The amount of virtual memory in megabytes used by the process at the time of the last mongostat call.

res

The amount of resident memory in megabytes used by the process at the time of the last mongostat call.

locked

The percent of time in a global write lock. Only appears when mongostat runs against pre-3.0 versions of MongoDB instances.

qr

The length of the queue of clients waiting to read data from the MongoDB instance.

qw

The length of the queue of clients waiting to write data from the MongoDB instance.

ar

The number of active clients performing read operations.

aw

The number of active clients performing write operations.

netIn

The amount of network traffic, in bytes, received by the MongoDB instance.

This includes traffic from mongostat itself.

netOut

The amount of network traffic, in bytes, sent by the MongoDB instance.

This includes traffic from mongostat itself.

conn

The total number of open connections.

set

The name, if applicable, of the replica set.

repl

The replication status of the member.

Value Replication Type
M master
SEC secondary
REC recovering
UNK unknown
RTR mongos process (“router”)
ARB arbiter

Examples

Run mongostat from the system command line, not the mongo shell.

Specify mongostat Collection Period and Frequency

In the first example, mongostat will return data every second for 20 seconds. mongostat collects data from the mongod instance running on the localhost interface on port 27017. All of the following invocations produce identical behavior:

mongostat --rowcount=20 1
mongostat --rowcount=20
mongostat -n=20 1
mongostat -n=20

In the next example, mongostat returns data every 5 minutes (or 300 seconds) for as long as the program runs. mongostat collects data from the mongod instance running on the localhost interface on port 27017. The following invocations produce identical behavior:

mongostat --rowcount=0 300
mongostat -n=0 300
mongostat 300

In the following example, mongostat returns data every 5 minutes for an hour (12 times.) mongostat collects data from the mongod instance running on the localhost interface on port 27017. The following invocations produce identical behavior:

mongostat --rowcount=12 300
mongostat -n=12 300

Add Fields to mongostat Output

-O allows you to specify fields from serverStatus output to add to the default mongostat output. The following example adds the host and version fields as well as the network.numRequests field, which will display as “network requests”, to the default mongostat output:

mongostat -O='host,version,network.numRequests=network requests'

The mongostat output would then resemble:

insert query update delete getmore command dirty used flushes vsize   res qrw arw net_in net_out conn                time            host version network requests
    *0    *0     *0     *0       0     2|0  0.0% 0.0%       0 2.51G 19.0M 0|0 0|0   158b   39.4k    2 Oct 11 12:14:45.878 localhost:37017  3.3.14               91
    *0    *0     *0     *0       0     1|0  0.0% 0.0%       0 2.51G 19.0M 0|0 0|0   157b   39.3k    2 Oct 11 12:14:46.879 localhost:37017  3.3.14               95
    *0    *0     *0     *0       0     1|0  0.0% 0.0%       0 2.51G 19.0M 0|0 0|0   157b   39.2k    2 Oct 11 12:14:47.884 localhost:37017  3.3.14               99

Specify mongostat Output Fields

-o specifies the columns mongostat includes in its output. You can specify any serverStatus field as a mongostat output column. The following example specifies the host, time, and metrics.document.inserted fields:

mongostat -o='host,time,metrics.document.inserted'

The mongostat output would then resemble:

           host                time metrics.document.inserted
localhost:37017 Oct 11 12:21:17.370                         0
localhost:37017 Oct 11 12:21:18.371                         0
localhost:37017 Oct 11 12:21:19.371                         0
localhost:37017 Oct 11 12:21:20.368                         0

View Rate of Change for a Field with .rate()

.rate() enables you to view the rate per second at which a numerical field has changed from one mongostat call to the next. For example, you can view the rate at which documents have been inserted during an insert operation. .rate() can therefore help you view the performance of your mongod instance.

The following example reports on the rate of change of the metrics.document.inserted serverStatus field. The invocation uses -o’s ability to specify the name of an column to label metrics.document.inserted.rate() as “inserted rate” and metrics.document.inserted as “inserted”:

mongostat -o='host,mem,bits,metrics.document.inserted.rate()=inserted rate,metrics.document.inserted=inserted' --rowcount=5

The output would then resemble:

           host mem.bits inserted rate inserted
localhost:37017       64           501     3455
localhost:37017       64           967    13128
localhost:37017       64           972    22851
localhost:37017       64           214    25000
localhost:37017       64             0    25000

View Field Changes with .diff()

.diff() returns the difference between the current serverStatus field value and the value from the previous mongostat call. The following example returns statistics on the number of documents being inserted into a collection: inserted diff is the difference in the metrics.document.inserted field between subsequent calls, while inserted is the value of metrics.document.inserted:

mongostat -o='host,mem.bits,metrics.document.inserted.diff()=inserted diff,metrics.document.inserted=inserted' --rowcount=5

The output would then resemble:

           host mem.bits inserted diff inserted
localhost:27017       64             0    25359
localhost:27017       64            94    25453
localhost:27017       64           938    26391
localhost:27017       64           964    27355
localhost:27017       64           978    28333

View Statistics for a Replica Set or Sharded Cluster

In many cases, using the --discover option will help provide a more complete snapshot of the state of an entire group of machines. If a mongos process connected to a sharded cluster is running on port 27017 of the local machine, you can use the following form to return statistics from all members of the cluster:

mongostat --discover

View Statistics in an Interactive Interface

Use the --interactive option to view statistics in a non-scrolling ncurses -style interactive output. The --interactive option lets you highlight specific hosts, columns, or fields to view. When combined with --discover, --interactive displays statistics for all members of a replica set or sharded cluster, as in the following example:

mongostat --discover --interactive

The output for a sharded cluster would then resemble:

                  host insert query update delete getmore command dirty used flushes mapped vsize   res faults qrw arw net_in net_out conn set repl                time
hostname.local:27018     *0    *0     *0     *0       0     1|0  0.0% 0.0%       0        3.25G 25.0M    n/a 0|0 1|0   157b   43.9k   19 tic  PRI Nov  2 11:44:46.439
hostname.local:27019     *0    *0     *0     *0       0     2|0  0.0% 0.0%       0        3.18G 26.0M    n/a 0|0 1|0   322b   44.4k   12 tic  SEC Nov  2 11:44:46.439
hostname.local:27020     *0    *0     *0     *0       0     2|0  0.0% 0.0%       0        3.18G 26.0M    n/a 0|0 1|0   322b   44.4k   12 tic  SEC Nov  2 11:44:46.439
hostname.local:27021   2017    *0     *0     *0     826  1029|0  0.0% 0.0%       0        3.25G 31.0M    n/a 0|0 1|0  1.74m   1.60m   20 tac  PRI Nov  2 11:44:46.439
hostname.local:27022  *2021    *0     *0     *0       0     2|0  0.0% 0.0%       0        3.19G 32.0M    n/a 0|0 1|0   322b   44.6k   12 tac  SEC Nov  2 11:44:46.438
hostname.local:27023  *2022    *0     *0     *0       0     3|0  0.0% 0.0%       0        3.19G 33.0M    n/a 0|0 1|0   323b   44.7k   12 tac  SEC Nov  2 11:44:46.438
     localhost:27017   2071    *0     *0     *0       0  2073|0                  0     0B 2.43G 9.00M      0 0|0 0|0   249k    130k    4      RTR Nov  2 11:44:47.429

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Connect to a MongoDB Atlas Cluster using AWS IAM Credentials

New in version 100.1.0.

To connect to a MongoDB Atlas cluster which has been configured to support authentication via AWS IAM credentials, provide a connection string to mongostat similar to the following:

mongostat 'mongodb+srv://<aws access key id>:<aws secret access key>@cluster0.example.com/testdb?authSource=$external&authMechanism=MONGODB-AWS' <other options>

Connecting to Atlas using AWS IAM credentials in this manner uses the MONGODB-AWS authentication mechanism and the $external authSource, as shown in this example.

If using an AWS session token, as well, provide it with the AWS_SESSION_TOKEN authMechanismProperties value, as follows:

mongostat 'mongodb+srv://<aws access key id>:<aws secret access key>@cluster0.example.com/testdb?authSource=$external&authMechanism=MONGODB-AWS&authMechanismProperties=AWS_SESSION_TOKEN:<aws session token>' <other options>

If the AWS access key ID, the secret access key, or the session token include the ‘at’ sign @, colon :, slash /, or the percent sign % characters, those characters must be converted using percent encoding.

Alternatively, the AWS access key ID, secret access key, and optionally session token can each be provided outside of the connection string using the --username, --password, and --awsSessionToken options instead, like so:

mongostat 'mongodb+srv://cluster0.example.com/testdb?authSource=$external&authMechanism=MONGODB-AWS' --username <aws access key id> --password <aws secret access key> --awsSessionToken <aws session token> <other options>

When provided as command line parameters, these three options do not require percent encoding.

You may also set these credentials on your platform using standard AWS IAM environment variables. mongostat checks for the following environment variables when you use the MONGODB-AWS authentication mechanism:

  • AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID
  • AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY
  • AWS_SESSION_TOKEN

If set, these credentials do not need to be specified in the connection string or via their explicit options.

Note

If you chose to use the AWS environment variables to specify these values, you cannot mix and match with the corresponding explicit or connection string options for these credentials. Either use the environment variables for access key ID and secret access key (and session token if used), or specify each of these using the explicit or connection string options instead.

The following example sets these environment variables in the bash shell:

export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID='<aws access key id>'
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY='<aws secret access key>'
export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN='<aws session token>'

Syntax for setting environment variables in other shells will be different. Consult the documentation for your platform for more information.

You can verify that these environment variables have been set with the following command:

env | grep AWS

Once set, the following example connects to a MongoDB Atlas cluster using these environment variables:

mongostat 'mongodb+srv://cluster0.example.com/testdb?authSource=$external&authMechanism=MONGODB-AWS'  <other options>

Additional Information

For more information about monitoring MongoDB, see Monitoring for MongoDB.

For more background on other MongoDB status outputs see:

For an additional utility that provides MongoDB metrics see mongotop.

←   mongoexport mongotop  →